Apple Denies Turkish Crime Family Hack, New Ransom Details Emerge

Earlier this week, there were reports on the media outlets stating a hacking incident affecting millions of iCloud and Apple Mail accounts. The accounts were said to be compromised by a hacker group calling themselves the “Turkish Crime Family”, who have claimed to now possess the capability to access these compromised accounts to wipe the … Continue reading Apple Denies Turkish Crime Family Hack, New Ransom Details Emerge

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Earlier this week, there were reports on the media outlets stating a hacking incident affecting millions of iCloud and Apple Mail accounts. The accounts were said to be compromised by a hacker group calling themselves the “Turkish Crime Family”, who have claimed to now possess the capability to access these compromised accounts to wipe the … Continue reading Apple Denies Turkish Crime Family Hack, New Ransom Details Emerge

The post Apple Denies Turkish Crime Family Hack, New Ransom Details Emerge appeared first on NEWSBTC.

Distributed Ledger Technology Vs Blockchain Technology

TheMerkle Blockchain DLTPeople often think of blockchain technology and distributed ledger technology as one and the same. Interestingly enough, that is not the case, even though it is not hard to see why some people would think along those lines. These terms have become entwined over the past few years, although it is important to distinguish the two from one another. Distributed Ledger Technology It is difficult to come across a unified explanation of how one should look at the concept of distributed ledger technology. A distributed ledger is a type of database spread across multiple sites, regions, or participants. As one

TheMerkle Blockchain DLT

People often think of blockchain technology and distributed ledger technology as one and the same. Interestingly enough, that is not the case, even though it is not hard to see why some people would think along those lines. These terms have become entwined over the past few years, although it is important to distinguish the two from one another.

Distributed Ledger Technology

It is difficult to come across a unified explanation of how one should look at the concept of distributed ledger technology. A distributed ledger is a type of database spread across multiple sites, regions, or participants. As one would expect, a distributed ledger has to be decentralized, otherwise it would resemble a centralized database like most companies use today. Removing the intermediary party from the equation is what makes the concept of distributed ledger technology so appealing.

Moreover, enterprises use distributed ledger technology to process, validate or authenticate transactions or other types of data exchanges. Records are stored in the ledger once consensus is achieved by the majority of parties. Every record stored in the distributed ledger is timestamped and has its very own cryptographic signature.

All of the participants on the distributed ledger can view all of the records in question. The technology provides a verifiable and auditable history of all information stored on that particular dataset. Distributed ledger technology will often to be referred to as DLT in financial and government circles.

Blockchain

On paper, the entire description of a distributed ledger sounds exactly like what most people think of when they envision a blockchain. However, the blockchain is just one particular type of distributed ledger. Most people know it as the technology powering bitcoin, Ethereum, and other popular cryptocurrencies. The name blockchain also refers to how “blocks” are added to the chain, which contains transaction records.

To make the chaining of blocks possible, the blockchain uses a cryptographic signature, known as a hash. In this sense, it is certainly possible to use a blockchain as a ledger, which can be shared with anyone and everyone. In the case of cryptocurrencies, this can be achieved by the other parties looking up blockchain information in real-time and even without installing specific software to do so.

What makes blockchains so intriguing is how they are so much more than just a simple data structure. It is possible to use a blockchain to determine rules for a transaction or even to create a smart contract. Moreover, a blockchain is a sequence of blocks, but distributed ledgers do not require such a chain. Furthermore, distributed ledgers do not require proof of work and offer – theoretically – better scaling options. Some implementations are capable of combining both a distributed ledger and blockchain, albeit this does not necessarily apply to every project focusing on either of these technologies.

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US Senate Votes in Favor Of ISPs Selling Consumer Data to Advertisers

TheMerkle US Senate Ends PrivacyConsumer privacy rights have taken yet another blow thanks to a new US Senate proposal getting approved. Just yesterday, the Senate voted on a proposal that effectively eliminates all privacy rules. Internet service providers are now eligible to sell all customer data to a third party, among other things. The End of Online Privacy As We Know It It is not the first, nor the last time the US senate has delivered a big blow to consumer privacy. As a result of their latest proposal vote, ISPs no longer need to get consumer consent before selling user’s browsing history and

TheMerkle US Senate Ends Privacy

Consumer privacy rights have taken yet another blow thanks to a new US Senate proposal getting approved. Just yesterday, the Senate voted on a proposal that effectively eliminates all privacy rules. Internet service providers are now eligible to sell all customer data to a third party, among other things.

The End of Online Privacy As We Know It

It is not the first, nor the last time the US senate has delivered a big blow to consumer privacy. As a result of their latest proposal vote, ISPs no longer need to get consumer consent before selling user’s browsing history and app usage history. This information can be sold to any third party in the world, although most of the “sales” will occur between the ISP and advertising companies.

Although the US Senate voted in favor of this proposal, it will still have to pass through the House of Representatives. Assuming they approve this proposal as well, it will nullify the latest privacy rules approved by the Federal Communications Commission altogether. A lot can change over the course of 18 months, that much is once again evident. These changes will not be well received by privacy advocates and internet users, though.

One thing to keep in mind is how this rule change will not go into effect until December 4th of this year. That being said, it is the only silver lining in this entire debacle. ISPs may soon be legally entitled to all of our data and they can reap the financial rewards from selling it to the highest bidder. This will only lead to even more annoying advertisements, which does not benefit anyone but advertising companies.

If that isn’t dire enough, this privacy rule change proposal invokes the Congressional Review Act. This means similar regulations cannot be issued in the future. This is even better news for internet service providers, as that means the Federal Communications Commission cannot reinstate the current rules. All they can do is draft new proposals, yet they cannot resemble the way things are handled right now.

It appears there is no stopping this proposal from getting approved by the House, though. The only people who can do so are the House and President Donald Trump. Rest assured the latter one has more important issues on his plate than dealing with consumer privacy right now. Moreover, it could be in both entities’ best interests to be able to to map households’ online browsing and shopping tendencies. Making America great again means bringing a much-needed boost to the economy, and selling consumer’s information can help achieve that goal.

In the end, this proposal allows any internet service provider in the United States to issue their own set of rules. There will be no “opting in” for consumers, as everyone will be monitored around the clock. It is uncertain what the future will hold, but rest assured the data harvesting will begin sooner or later. Once that trend starts, there will be no turning back whatsoever.

Usage of anonymity tools like TOR and VPNs may also see a rise as a direct result of this decision. It is important to keep one’s privacy when surfing online as I am sure nobody would want their browsing history sold for a profit.

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